What Happened To The IL Residents Charged In Jan. 6 Capitol Riot?

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ILLINOIS — At least 19 Illinoisans are accused of taking part in a mob that breached the U.S. Capitol one year ago, on Jan. 6, breaking windows, ransacking offices and clashing with police officers in a failed attempt to keep Donald Trump in the White House.

In addition to those charged in connection with the Capitol riot, which the Architect of the Capitol said caused about $1.5 million of damage, at least two Illinois residents were cited for Jan. 6 curfew violations but not accused of actually entering the Capitol.

Most of the Illinoisans facing charges have not yet learned their fate, with the exception of two Danville men who received probation and 60 days of community service, and a former tech CEO who was sentenced to 30 days in jail and a $500 fine.

Find out what’s happening in Chicago with free, real-time updates from Patch.

Nationwide, more than 725 people from all 50 states and the District of Coumbia have been charged in connection with the insurrection, but few have gotten more than a slap on the wrist. Of more than 70 who have been sentenced so far, just over half received any prison time, according to Politico. Of those who have gone to prison, their sentences have mostly been measured in days, not months or years — many have received just probation or community service — largely thanks to plea deals with prosecutors.

Of those charged, more than 225 people have been accused of assault, including 75 charged with assault with a deadly weapon.

Find out what’s happening in Chicago with free, real-time updates from Patch.

According to the Department of Justice, 140 police officers were assaulted by the mob on Jan. 6, including 80 Capitol police officers and 60 from the D.C. Metropolitan Police Department. Members of the media were also assaulted or had their equipment destroyed.

Here’s a rundown of everyone from Illinois who has been charged in connection with the insurrection and what’s happened to them since their arrest.

Thomas B. Adams Jr. of Springfield — charged with knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building without lawful authority, violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds and obstruction of an official proceeding. Adams was arrested April 13 in Springfield and is currently free on personal recognizance.

Matthew Capsel of Marseilles — charged with knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building without lawful authority; violence to any person or property in a restricted building; interfering with an office of the United States government; and interfering with law enforcement during the commission of a civil disorder. Capsel was arrested Jan. 26 in southern Illinois after a friend sent the FBI a TikTok video he posted. He is free on personal recognizance with a curfew.

Read more: IL Man Charged In Capitol Riots After Friends Send FBI His TikTok

Karol J. Chwiesiuk of Chicago — charged with knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building without lawful authority and violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds. Chwiesiuk, a Chicago police officer, was arrested June 11 and is free on personal recognizance. Chicago’s rank-and-file police union, the Fraternal Order of Police, is currently asking a judge to let Chwiesiuk keep his badge and gun.

Read more: Union Lobbies For Chicago Cop Charged In Capitol Insurrection

James Robert Elliott of Aurora — charged with entering a restricted building with a deadly weapon; disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building with a deadly weapon, engaging in physical violence in a restricted building with a deadly weapon; committing an act of physical violence in the Capitol Building, assaulting a police officer and civil disorder. Elliott, who is from Aurora and goes by “Jim Bob” is a member of the racist, far-right Proud Boys paramilitary group, and is accused of striking Capitol police officers with a flag pole. He was recently arrested Dec. 20 in Batavia.

Read more: Aurora Man Used Flagpole In Capitol Breach Assault: DOJ

Dawn Frankowski of Naperville — charged with entering and remaining in a restricted building; disorderly conducted in a restricted building; disorderly conduct in a Capitol building; and parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building. Frankowski was arrested Sept. 21 in Naperville. No information was immediately available on the status of her case.

Read more: 2 Illinoisans Charged In Capitol Riots After Social Media Posts

Christina and Jason Gerding of Quincy — charged with entering and remaining in a restricted building; disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building; disorderly conduct in a Capitol building; and parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building. The Gerdings were arrested Jan. 28 in Quincy. Both were arraigned Feb. 26 and pleaded not guilty. No further update on their case was available from the Department of Justice.

Read more: Illinois Couple Accused In Deadly Capitol Riot Referenced QAnon

Marcos Gleffe of Elk Grove Village — charged with knowingly entering or remaining in a restricted building without lawful authority; disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building; disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds; and parading, demonstrating or picketing in any Capitol building. Gleffe was arrested Sept. 2 in Elk Grove Village after the FBI identified him from a Facebook photo. He pleaded not guilty at an arraignment on Dec. 10 and has yet to be sentenced.

Read more: Elk Grove Village Man Faces Capitol Riot Charges

Bruce J. Harrison of Danville — charged with knowingly entering or remaining in a restricted building without lawful authority; disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building; disorderly conduct in a Capitol building; and parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building. Harrison was arrested May 28 in Illinois, and pleaded guilty to parading in a deal with prosecutors. He was sentenced to probation and 60 hours of community service.

Christian and Mark Kulas of Kenilworth and Lake Forest, respectively — charged with unlawful entry to a restricted building; disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds; and parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building. According to the FBI, investigators got multiple tips about Christian Kulas’ involvement in the Capitol riot after he posted a video on social media in which he admitted to “storming the Capitol.” The brothers were arrested June 8 and later pleaded guilty to parading in a deal with prosecutors. They are scheduled to be sentenced on March 7.

Read more: North Shore Brothers Plead Guilty To Capitol Riot Charges

Lawrence Ligas of Chicago — charged with entering or remaining in a restricted building without lawful authority; disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building; disorderly conduct in a Capitol building; and parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building. He was arrested Dec. 1 in Chicago. The FBI said the self-described “MAGA party” member took photos and was seen on video inside the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6.

Read more: Longtime Chicago Activist Larry Ligas Charged In Capitol Riot

Kevin James Lyons of Chicago — charged with entering and remaining in a restricted building; entering and remaining in certain rooms in the Capitol Building; and disorderly conduct in a Capitol building. Lyons was arrested Jan. 13, 2021, in northern Illinois, and pleaded not guilty. When the FBI showed him a social media photo proving he was at the Capitol, he reportedly told agents, “Wow, you are pretty good. That was up for only an hour.” Lyons’ latest court appearance was scheduled for October. The Department of Justice had no further update on his case.

Read more: IL Man Accused Of Entering Capitol To FBI: ‘You’re Pretty Good’

Bradley Rukstales of Inverness — charged with knowingly entering or remaining in a restricted building; disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building; violent entry and disorderly conduct in a Capitol building; and parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building. The Inverness CEO was arrested Jan. 11 in Washington, D.C., and later pleaded guilty to a charge of parading. At trial, prosecutors showed video of Rukstales throwing a chair at police officers. He apologized, calling it the “the single worst personal decision of my life,” and was sentenced to 30 days in jail and $500 restitution. Cogensia, a Schaumburg-based data analytics firm, fired him as CEO.

Read more: 3 Illinoisans Charged, Some Fired After Mob Assault On Capitol

Amy and John Schubert of Crest Hill — charged with knowingly entering or remaining in a restricted building without lawful authority and violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds. The Crest Hill couple were arrested July 26 and both pleaded guilty to a reduced charged in a deal with prosecutors. They are scheduled to be sentenced in February.

Read more: Crest Hill Couple Breached Capitol At Jan. 6 Insurrection: Feds

Douglas K. Wangler of Danville — charged with entering or remaining in a restricted building without lawful authority; disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building; disorderly conduct in a Capitol building; and parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building. Wrangler was arrested May 28 and pleaded guilty to parading in a deal with prosecutors. At sentencing on Dec. 16, Wangler apologized and told a judge he “deeply regrets” taking part in the riot. He was sentenced to probation and 60 hours of community service.

David Wiersma of Posen — charged with entering or remaining in a restricted building without lawful authority; disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building; disorderly conduct in a Capitol building; and parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building. He was arrested Sept. 21 in Posen. No further information was immediately available on Wiersma’s case.

Read more: 2 Illinoisans Charged In Capitol Riots After Social Media Posts

Shane Jason Woods of Auburn — charged with assaulting a law enforcement officer; assault in a special maritime and territorial jurisdiction; obstructing law enforcement during a civil disorder; entering a restricted building; disorderly conduct in a restricted building; engaging in an act of physical violence in a restricted building; violent entry or disorderly conduct; and an act of physical violence on restricted grounds. Woods was arrested June 24 in Springfield. “I admit I was there, and I am proud of the fact that I was there, and stood up for a cause that I believed in. I have no problem with that,” Woods said, according to the FBI. No further information was immediately available about the status of his case.

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